Nutritious Nuggets: Five steps to fighting sugar cravings

I remember before I studied health and fitness, I would have CRAZY sweet cravings and binge on anything I could find in the pantry. You might be thinking it’s all about “will power” right? Well, that’s not always the case. Even as a person with plenty of knowledge and will power. I can still get sucked into cravings if I don’t properly nourish my body ahead of time or have food already prepped. If you’re struggling with sugar cravings, take a look below for some tips to help fight those cravings.

Six steps to help fight sugar cravings

  1. Nourish your body every 3-4 hours by incorporating at least one source of fiber and protein. Try avoiding extreme hunger.
  2. Drink plenty of water and stay hydrated. Thirst is often confused for hunger and cravings.
  3. Add in some fermented foods into your diet to help boost beneficial bacteria in the gut.
    • Ex. Yogurt, kimchi, kombucha, sauerkraut.
  4. Identify whether it’s a physical or a pang of emotional hunger, then determine whether to eat and what to eat.
    • If it’s emotional, instead of giving in right away distance yourself from the craving, you can do this by calling a friend, going for a walk,  or setting a timer that prolongs the decision.
    • If it’s physical, try first eating a source of fiber and protein to see if that curbs your sweet tooth and then opting for a nourishing sweet like a fruit,  smoothie bowl or date power balls, etc. 
  5. Avoid bringing more than one highly processed or packaged sweet into your home. Making those cravings one step harder to get and eat.
    • Ex: Bag or bags of candy, a box of soda, an entire cake, gallon of ice cream, etc.

 

Occasionally indulging in sweets is a fine tasty treat, however, if you’re experiencing constant sugar cravings or feel out of control, then it might be worth identifying what’s causing it and what solution works best for you. The aim of this is not deprivation; The aim is to reset your tastebuds to gain more pleasure from flavors and natural sweetness of whole, unprocessed foods.